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Hypothermic treatment: Hạ thân nhiệt xuống 93 độ F trong 4-20 ngày giúp hồi phục não bộ…

Posted by hoangtran204 trên 21/02/2009

(Dịch sau)

OCEANSIDE: ‘Miracle’ recovery astounds

man’s family

Hypothermic treatment contributes to revival

This story has been corrected since its original posting

By PAUL SISSON – Staff Writer | Wednesday, February 18, 2009 5:02 PM PST

OCEANSIDE —- Mike Connolly’s family and many of his nurses are calling him a miracle man —- and doctors are hard-pressed to disagree.

The 56-year-old Vista man’s heart stopped in late January and he lay in a coma for 96 hours before his family tearfully gave the OK for physicians at Tri-City Medical Center to disconnect life support.

That’s when Connolly woke up.

His stepson, Mike Cooper, was reading Scripture beside Connolly’s hospital bed last week when he saw a tear slide down the man’s cheek.

Cooper said he didn’t think that was significant until he left the room and started walking down the hallway, only to hear shouts from a family member still at Connolly’s side.

“He said Mike was responding,” Cooper said. “I didn’t believe him, but I went back in there, and it was true. You would say his name, and he would turn his head toward you. It was a miracle.”

Though doctors had pronounced Connolly’s case hopeless and said his brain would never recover, today he is showing steady progress. Those same doctors say Connolly seems headed for a full recovery.

Martin Nielsen, Connolly’s pulmonary doctor, said it is not a stretch to call the sudden recovery miraculous.

“When we get a guy like Mike Connolly, it’s almost like a miracle,” Nielsen said. “I’ve never seen anybody come back like he has.”

Connolly’s ordeal started at his home around 6 a.m. Jan. 31, when he developed an arrhythmia —- an electrical short circuit in the heart muscle that causes the vital organ to stop beating, usually with no warning.

Connolly’s wife, Loris, said she awoke to the sound of choking.

She found her husband slumped forward in his easy chair, a half-eaten bowl of Raisin Bran in his lap, in the living room of the couple’s Vista apartment.

At 6 feet 8 inches and more than 250 pounds, Connolly is not easy to move.

His wife was unable to get him out of his chair and onto the floor by herself.

“I found him totally unconscious,” she recalled Monday. “I couldn’t find a pulse. I couldn’t find any air. He wasn’t breathing.”

Fearing her husband was dead, Loris Connolly called 911. According to NorthComm fire dispatch records, the call came in at 6:10 a.m. and paramedics arrived at the apartment on Shadowridge Drive at 6:16 a.m.

Nielsen said that when paramedics arrived, Connolly’s heart had stopped beating.

He said an electrocardiogram tape recorded during resuscitation efforts showed that paramedics performed CPR and delivered multiple shocks with a portable defibrillator for about 35 minutes before they were able to get the man’s heart beating again.

Although no one knows exactly how long Connolly’s brain went without oxygen, Nielsen said it had to be at least 10 minutes. That length of time, he said, usually results in severe brain damage if a patient ever regains consciousness.

“Generally, the rule of thumb is if you go for more than four minutes without oxygen, you will see severe damage to the brain,” Nielsen said.

Paramedics drove the unconscious man to Tri-City Medical Center, where doctors decided that inducing hypothermia was Connolly’s best chance for survival.

They used special cooling blankets to drop his temperature from the normal 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit to about 93 degrees.

The cold, Nielsen explained, helps keep the brain from swelling and has been shown in clinical studies to reduce brain damage.

After 24 hours of cooling, doctors tried to bring Connolly out of an induced coma, but every time they did, he suffered seizures.

Seizures, Nielsen said, are usually a sign that a patient is not going to recover. The family prepared for the worst, but prayed nonetheless.

Connolly woke up a few days later.

Sitting in his hospital room Monday, Connolly conversed with family members and joked with nurses, some who have taken to calling him the “miracle man.”

He said his chest aches from the CPR.

“Judging by the way my sternum feels, I’m pretty lucky,” he said. “This is all still sinking in, and I think it will be for a long time.”

In the 12 days since he awoke, Connolly has suffered muscle spasms —- some violent —- that have only recently begun so subside, his wife said.

Loris Connolly said she will always cherish the moment she saw her husband come around.

“When I finally heard the word ‘hope,’ that’s the best word I ever heard,” she said.

Family friends set up a “miracle man” trust fund at Wells Fargo Bank to help the Connollys defray the cost of his long hospital stay.

Donations can be made care of Marilyn Cipriani, 1075 Shadowridge Drive. Unit 70, Vista, CA 92081.

Contact staff writer Paul Sisson at (760) 901-4087 or psisson@nctimes.com.

CORRECTION: ‘Miracle man’s’ name misspelled

In a story in Tuesday’s North County Times about a Vista man who made what some have called a miraculous recovery after four days in a coma, the man’s name was misspelled. His name is Mike Connolly. We apologize.

Mike Connelly is greeted by his wife, Loris, at Tri-City Medical Center on Monday. (Photo by Bill Wechter – staff photographer

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2009/02/16/news/coastal/oceanside/z2c380328ce6aed428825755f007dcc90.txt

—————————————–

On Saturday Nite, January 17th., church members and friends were enjoying a Christian concert with the rock band ‘Etify’ at Rushing Wind Church in Oceanside.

The band was playing when suddenly, the drummer, Johnny Miller passed out and fell off the stool at the drum kit!

The room went into panic mode. People were scurrying to help each other and trying to figure out what to do.

Thankfully, a few people actually knew what to do. Pastor Denver of Rushing Wind Ministries in the Inland Empire, and Johnny’s wife, who had “just” completed EMT training, jumped into action.
They started CPR on Johnny and traded their duties, just trying to keep Johnny alive until the paramedics arrived.

At this time Johnny had no pulse, was not breathing, and was turning blue. About 10 minutes later the Emergency Technicians showed up. They took out the defibrillator and began shocking him.

After the third time they shocked him, one technician said “we’re done.” A few seconds went by and another technician said “Let’s try one more time.”

Thank God that this young man gave it one more try. Johnny came back, breathing and with a pulse. They quickly got him to the ER. Then began a series of operations: angioplasty. stints, and most recently open heart surgery.

He will have a long rehabilitation period, but he is very happy to be alive. His wife and family are blessed that he is still with them !
A miracle? I’m sure some will call it that, while others will disagree.

Pastor Fred Z, Rushing Wind Oceanside say of the hundreds of concerts he arranged, none ended like this one

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2009/02/16/news/coastal/oceanside/z2c380328ce6aed428825755f007dcc90.txt

———————————

Doctors transplant windpipe with stem cells Posted document.write(niceDate(’11/19/2008 1:58 PM’));11/19/2008

LONDON — Doctors have given a woman a new windpipe with tissue grown from her own stem cells, eliminating the need for anti-rejection drugs. “This technique has great promise,” said Dr. Eric Genden, who did a similar transplant in 2005 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. That operation used both donor and recipient tissue. Only a handful of windpipe, or trachea, transplants have ever been done.

If successful, the procedure could become a new standard of treatment, said Genden, who was not involved in the research.

The results were published online Wednesday in the medical journal, The Lancet.

The transplant was given to Claudia Castillo, a 30-year-old Colombian mother of two living in Barcelona, suffered from tuberculosis for years. After a severe collapse of her left lung in March, Castillo needed regular hospital visits to clear her airways and was unable to take care of her children.

Doctors initially thought the only solution was to remove the entire left lung. But Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, head of thoracic surgery at Barcelona’s Hospital Clinic, proposed a windpipe transplant instead.

Once doctors had a donor windpipe, scientists at Italy’s University of Padua stripped off all its cells, leaving only a tube of connective tissue.

Meanwhile, doctors at the University of Bristol took a sample of Castillo’s bone marrow from her hip. They used the bone marrow’s stem cells to create millions of cartilage and tissue cells to cover and line the windpipe.

Experts at the University of Milan then used a device to put the new cartilage and tissue onto the windpipe. The new windpipe was transplanted into Castillo in June.

“They have created a functional, biological structure that can’t be rejected,” said Dr. Allan Kirk of the American Society of Transplantation. “It’s an important advance, but constructing an entire organ is still a long way off.”

So far, Castillo has shown no signs of rejection and is not taking any immune-suppressing drugs, which can cause side effects like high blood pressure, kidney failure and cancer.

“I was scared at the beginning,” Castillo said in a press statement. “I am now enjoying life and am very happy that my illness has been cured.”

Her doctors say she is now able to take care of her children, and can walk reasonable distances without becoming out of breath. Castillo even reported dancing all night at a club in Barcelona recently.

Genden said that Castillo’s progress needed to be closely monitored. “Time will tell if this lasts,” he said. Genden added that it can take up to three years to know if the windpipe’s cartilage structure is solid and won’t fall apart.

People who might benefit include children born with defective airways, people with scars or tumours in their windpipes, and those with collapsed windpipes.

Martin Birchall, who grew Castillo’s cells at the University of Bristol, said that the technique might even be adapted to other organs.

“Patients engineering their own tissues is the key way forward,” said Dr. Patrick Warnke, a surgeon at the University of Kiel in Germany. Warnke is also growing patients’ tissues from stem cells for transplants.

Warnke predicted that doctors might one day be able to produce organs in the laboratory from patients’ own stem cells. “That is still years away, but we need pioneering approaches like this to solve the problem,” he said.

Doctors transplant windpipe with stem cells Updated document.write(niceDate(’11/20/2008 7:23 PM’));11/20/2008

ONDON (AP) — Doctors have given a woman a new windpipe with tissue grown from her own stem cells, eliminating the need for anti-rejection drugs.

“This technique has great promise,” said Dr. Eric Genden, who did a similar transplant in 2005 at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. That operation used both donor and recipient tissue. Only a handful of windpipe, or trachea, transplants have ever been done.

If successful, the procedure could become a new standard of treatment, said Genden, who was not involved in the research.

The results were published online Wednesday in the medical journal, The Lancet.

The transplant was given to Claudia Castillo, a 30-year-old Colombian mother of two living in Barcelona, wh suffered from tuberculosis for years. After a severe collapse of her left lung in March, Castillo needed regular hospital visits to clear her airways and was unable to take care of her children.

Doctors initially thought the only solution was to remove the entire left lung. But Dr. Paolo Macchiarini, head of thoracic surgery at Barcelona’s Hospital Clinic, proposed a windpipe transplant instead.

Once doctors had a donor windpipe, scientists at Italy’s University of Padua stripped off all its cells, leaving only a tube of connective tissue.

Meanwhile, doctors at the University of Bristol took a sample of Castillo’s bone marrow from her hip. They used the bone marrow’s stem cells to create millions of cartilage and tissue cells to cover and line the windpipe.

Experts at the University of Milan then used a device to put the new cartilage and tissue onto the windpipe. The new windpipe was transplanted into Castillo in June.

“They have created a functional, biological structure that can’t be rejected,” said Dr. Allan Kirk of the American Society of Transplantation. “It’s an important advance, but constructing an entire organ is still a long way off.”

So far, Castillo has shown no signs of rejection and is not taking any immune-suppressing drugs, which can cause side effects such as high blood pressure, kidney failure and cancer.

“I was scared at the beginning,” Castillo said in a press statement. “I am now enjoying life and am very happy that my illness has been cured.”

Her doctors say she is now able to take care of her children and can walk reasonable distances without becoming out of breath. Castillo even reported dancing all night at a club in Barcelona recently.

Genden said that Castillo’s progress needed to be closely monitored. “Time will tell if this lasts,” he said. Genden added that it can take up to three years to know if the windpipe’s cartilage structure is solid and won’t fall apart.

People who might benefit include children born with defective airways, people with scars or tumours in their windpipes, and those with collapsed windpipes.

Martin Birchall, who grew Castillo’s cells at the University of Bristol, said that the technique might even be adapted to other organs.

“Patients engineering their own tissues is the key way forward,” said Dr. Patrick Warnke, a surgeon at the University of Kiel in Germany. Warnke is also growing patients’ tissues from stem cells for transplants.

Warnke predicted that doctors might one day be able to produce organs in the laboratory from patients’ own stem cells. “That is still years away, but we need pioneering approaches like this to solve the problem,” he said.

received from email

Claudia Castillo

Claudia Castillo, 30, suffered from tuberculosis for years.

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